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#magnesium #deficincy #signs Magnesium Deficiency - 9 Signs
#magnesium #deficincy #signs

19.05.2017 13:00

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Magnesium Deficiency
9 Signs

1. Leg Cramps
Seventy percent of adults and 7 percent of children experience leg cramps on a regular basis.
But leg cramps can more than a nuisance — they can also be downright excruciating!
Because of magnesium’s role in neuromuscular signals and muscle contraction, researchers have observed that magnesium deficiency is often to blame.

More and more health care professionals are prescribing magnesium supplements to help their patients.
Restless leg syndrome is another warning sign of a magnesium deficiency.
To overcome both leg cramps and restless leg syndrome, you will want to increase your intake of both magnesium and potassium.

2. Insomnia
Magnesium deficiency is often a precursor to sleep disorders such as anxiety, hyperactivity and restlessness.
It’s been suggested that this is because magnesium is vital for GABA function, an inhibitory neurotransmitter known to “calm” the brain and promote relaxation.

Taking around 400 milligrams of magnesium before bed or with dinner is the best time of day to take the supplement.
Also, adding in magnesium-rich foods during dinner — like nutrition-packed spinach — may help.

3. Muscle Pain / Fibromyalgia
A study published in Magnesium Research examined the role magnesium plays in fibromyalgia symptoms, and it uncovered that increasing magnesium consumption reduced pain and tenderness and also improved immune blood markers. 

Oftentimes linked to autoimmune disorders, this research should encourage fibromyalgia patients because it highlights the systemic effects that magnesium supplements have on the body.

4. Anxiety
As magnesium deficiency can affect the central nervous system, more specifically the GABA cycle in the body, its side effects can include irritability and nervousness.
As the deficiency worsens, it causes high levels of anxiety and, in severe cases, depression and hallucinations.

Magnesium is needed for every cell function from the gut to the brain, so it’s no wonder that it affects so many systems.

5. High Blood Pressure
Magnesium works partnered with calcium to support proper blood pressure and protect the heart. So when you are magnesium deficient, often you are also low in calcium and tend towards hypertension or high blood pressure.

6. Type II Diabetes
One of the four main causes of magnesium deficiency is type II diabetes, but it’s also a common symptom. U.K. researchers, for example, uncovered that of the 1,452 adults they examined low, magnesium levels were 10 times more common with new diabetics and 8.6 times more common with known diabetics.

As expected from this data, diets rich in magnesium has been shown to significantly lower the risk of type 2 diabetes because of magnesium’s role in sugar metabolism.
Another study discovered that the simple addition of magnesium supplementation (100 milligrams/day) lowered the risk of diabetes by 15 percent!  

7. Fatigue
Low energy, weakness and fatigue are common symptoms of magnesium deficiency.
Most chronic fatigue syndrome patients are also magnesium deficient.
The University of Maryland Medical Center reports that 300–1,000 milligrams of magnesium per day can help, but you do also want to be careful, as too much magnesium can also cause diarrhea.

If you experience this side effect, you can simply reduce your dosage a little until the side effect subsides.

8. Migraine Headaches
Magnesium deficiency has been linked to migraine headaches due to its importance in balancing neurotransmitters in the body.
Double-blind placebo-controlled studies have proven that 360–600 milligrams of magnesium daily reduced the frequency of migraine headaches by up to 42 percent.

9. Osteoporosis
The National Institute of Health reports that, “The average person’s body contains about 25 grams of magnesium, and about half of that is in the bones.”
This is important to realize, especially for the elderly, who are at risk of bone weakening.

Thankfully, there’s hope!
A study published in Biology Trace Element Research uncovered that supplementing with magnesium slowed the development of osteoporosis “significantly” after just 30 days.
In addition to taking magnesium supplement, you will also want to consider getting more vitamin D3 and K2 to naturally build bone density.

















text adapted from draxe.com
photo/pexels.